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  • San Francisco’s Latest Tech Problem: Everyone Has a Job

    Article by Lauren Winklepleck, Lead Recruiter in Workbridge San Francisco   

    It seems like almost every technology-based startup in the San Francisco area is hiring for someone that is technical. Whether that be for a DevOps Engineer, Big Data/Hadoop Developer, Ruby on Rails Engineer, or a UI/UX Designer— the SF tech market is booming dramatically and now more than ever…even more than in the dotcom boom of the early 2000’s!

    Back in the first quarter of 2001 there were roughly 32,521  high tech jobs open in San Francisco whereas in Q4 of 2013 there were approximately 53, 319 open tech jobs (source: CBRE research analysis of CA employment development data). That’s a 63.9% increase in 12 years!

    So with over 50,000 open tech jobs in San Francisco, how are these startups filling their roles and capturing great talent?

    There are a several ways these startups are filling their roles— the most effective way, I’ve observed, is keeping in touch with personal networks as well as expanding them.

    Successful hiring managers are reaching out to past colleagues, buddies from college, and even developers they overhear doing a technical phone interview on the MUNI train! 

    In San Francisco, specifically, software engineers have a 2% unemployment rate compared to 4.4% unemployment nationwide. The job market for engineers is hotter than ever, meaning companies will do whatever it takes to make their next great hire.

    As startups continue to receive more funding, more tech jobs will open, which will continue to make the competition for candidates harder than ever—this trend shows no sign of slowing. It’s exciting to see where the San Francisco tech market will be a year from now!

  • The Growing Relationship Between Tech and Education

    Article by Christine Arnold, Lead Marketing Specialist in Workbridge Chicago.

    It’s crazy how much back-to-school checklists have changed since I was in school. I remember how excited I used to get to pick out a new matching set of folders, a pack of fancy roller-ball pens, a trapper-keeper I could decorate with white-out doodles. Fine, maybe I was an office-supply nerd. But those lists these days read a little differently. My sister is going into her freshman year of High School this year, and I was shocked when she told me that her school required the use of tablets in place of text books. Computers? In the classroom? I wasn’t even allowed to remove my Walkman from my backpack while I was on premises!

    She has the option of bringing her own tablet, or of renting one from the school. I assume there’s some sort of financial aid system in place to provide them to students who can’t afford the rental fees. Then, a week before school starts, the students are invited to a mandatory orientation where instructors walk them through which apps to download, and how to navigate them once they do. You’re probably wondering what’s stopping these kids from playing Angry Birds all class. The apps lock down the device so that they can’t access other applications.

    All of this got me thinking about the growing relationship between technology and education. What else is out there that wasn’t around while I was in school? Well, it as it turns out, there’s a lot. In Chicago alone, we’ve got an array of companies doing some really amazing things in the education space. Packback Books, a company that was recently featured on SharkTank, is making huge waves in the textbook industry. They offer affordable short-term rentals of many college textbooks, and their inventory is only continuing to grow. How amazing would that option have been when you were in school? I know I spent upwards of $1000 each semester on my textbooks alone. It would’ve been nice to put some of that money toward tuition instead.

    Another really cool company is Overgrad. They’re a student tracking system that helps create awareness about colleges starting day-1 of your freshman year of high school. They use student data to project which colleges the student will be a good fit for. I’m pretty sure I didn’t even start thinking about college until after I took the ACT my junior year. Not that I regret my decisions, but I imagine that whole process would have been much less overwhelming if the onslaught of information had been gradual. And think about kids in lower income or rural areas, where going to college isn’t necessarily a given. Starting students off prepared and with realistic goals and expectations, and the chance to alter their performance based on those goals, will set them up for a life of success. It gives them more control over their own future.

    If you’re interested in learning about more Chicago companies revolutionizing education, check out this event we’re sponsoring on August 20th: Back to School Ed Tech Demos & Drinks.

  • The Power of a Thank You Note

    Article by Anneika Kerr, Lead Recruiter in Workbridge Boston

    In your job search, chances are you will be introduced to a variety of companies and, most importantly, to many people. Therefore following up those interactions to show your appreciation can positively impact both your job search and your future. In fact, studies have found that a “thank you” note can help you land a new job.

    ·         90% of hiring managers said that being thanked for a job interview had a helpful impact on the candidate’s chances

    ·         Over 80% of hiring managers stated that email and phone calls are appropriate ways to thank an employer

    These notes shouldn’t be long and laborious; instead, it is always best to be concise but memorable. Your note should cover 3 parts: appreciation for their time, why you would be a good fit for the role and in the company, and mention of the future. See below an example:

    Hi Rick –

    It was wonderful meeting you on Monday for an initial interview. I appreciate you taking the time to explain to me how Spear Mint, Inc. works and what you’re looking for in a developer for your team.

    We’d spoken about the need for a full stack developer who understands how to design a simple solution for a complex problem. While at Bubble Yum, Inc. I’d worked on two projects from soup to nuts and feel confidently that my skill set would be an asset on your team.

    I look forward to continuing our conversation with your team in the future.

    Best,

    Solomon

    No hiring manager is looking for a 2 page letter. Just a few quick thoughts on why you are a great fit is all that’s needed. These notes assist in the building of a relationship between you and the interviewer, as well as their company. Here in our SF office, we have seen the benefits countless times.  

    Recently we worked with a candidate, Mike, who was newly on the job market. He mentioned a response he had received, a year prior, to a thank you note he had written. During the initial interview process, he’d found another job and let the manager know while also thanking him for his time. The response Bob received was to get back in touch if he was ever looking again, so he had us reach out. After two interviews and two more thank you notes – my office congratulated him on his new job with that same manager.

    That is the power of a thank you note. 

  • The Future of Infrastructure in an Agile World: DevOps and Release Engineering

    Article by Max Schnepper, Practice Manager in Workbridge Orange County.

    Systems Engineering is literally the only profession I’ve ever heard of where the term “Lazy” was used as term of endearment, “a lazy sys admin is a good sys admin.” If you hadn’t heard this phrase, what they’re getting at is doing something right the first time so that you don’t have to deal with it again, usually through scripting, automation and making everything scalable.

    DevOps: It’s nothing that new. You or your favorite admin could have been doing this for quite a while. Whether or not you’ve ever heard of it, DevOps has been given an actual title, a more formalized structure/methodology and has been growing exponentially. As Software-as-a-Serive (SaaS) companies continue moving towards more collaborative development environments utilizing Agile/Scrum methodologies from the more traditional Waterfall methodology, so too does the way the software teams collaborate with Operations teams.

    Even in more traditional brick and mortar markets such as Orange County where financial, Real Estate, and Insurance type companies rule the market, DevOps and Build/Release has recently picked up substantially. Want to know why? Whether you’re a start-up looking to release your product onto Beta, concerned about scalability when your company hits critical mass, or you’re a highly profitable fortune 500 company trying to keep up with your updates on heavy production servers, you should be hiring a DevOps engineer. The future of technology is collaboration and scalability, and that’s the goal of DevOps.

    If you want to learn more about DevOps, I encourage you to research resources like Chef Cookbooks, perusing Github, follow twitter handles like ScriptRock and see what is out there. Take a look at what’s going on in your local market with networking groups and events specifically geared towards DevOps. As an emerging market, there’s only room to grow!

  • Five Ways to Keep Top Contractors Engaged

     

    By: James Vallone and Ben Sanborn

         You know how hard it was to find a top contractor, right? Well, now that you have him or her onboard, what are you doing to ensure they stay engaged and retained? Contractors today have a plethora of offers to choose from. Since most work on a temporary basis, they are continually evaluating offers and lining up their next job – even while they work for you. If they have a bad experience with your company, you risk losing them and you risk the potential loss of referrals of other great contractors. (Yes, contractors refer non-competing contractors to companies they know are reliable and great to work for! They also warn others to stay away from bad experiences.) You are not only vying for a contractor’s expertise, but for their loyalty. So, how do you keep contractors engaged and happy?

         The best way to do so is to understand what contractors value in their work experience. Most contractors are independent, pride themselves on providing great customer service, love the thrill of fresh challenges, value open communication, want to feel as if they are part of your team, and appreciate clear direction about what your project objectives are and how they can meet them. There are ways to ensure that you create a positive experience for contractors. Here are the top five:

    1. Onboard quickly and completely. Just because they may not be in the office every day, doesn’t mean they don’t need to know where the bathroom is! Provide a full orientation. Give them a building tour and introduce them to key people they will work with or need to know. Discuss hours, break times, access to the building, and parking. Make sure they have the right technology and equipment to do the job, know how to access systems, and how to communicate with your Helpdesk. If they are not working for an agency, be sure they understand how and when to submit their timesheets and who to contact if they have an issue. You want to make a good first impression. If you don’t, contractors will assume you do not fully value them or will end up feeling less than confident about how to fit in and meet your needs.
    2. Treat them like a team member. Too often, contractors are left out of the game. While they work for you, treat them like a true member of your team. Be inclusive. This is particularly important if your contractor works offsite. Invite them to company events, celebrations, happy hours. Keep them abreast of internal news and updates. Clue them in about company politics and any pertinent historical info that would be useful to know. You want to make them feel welcome and included. That said, be mindful that some contractors do not want to be down in the weeds more than they have to be. If a contractor doesn’t jump to attend happy hours, be respectful and don’t take it as a negative sign. Many contractors became contractors to avoid the hassle and extra-curricular activities that being an employee entails.
    3. Dedicate time for one-on-one meetings. Include your contractor in team meetings, but don’t overlook the value of having regular one-on-ones. Weekly check-ins or even just an informal coffee or lunch on a regular basis can help you keep tabs on how satisfied the contractor is with your company and if they are running into any hindrances that they don’t want to discuss in front of the entire team. Contractors want to be included as a team member; keep in mind that that they are not employees though. As an outsider, they can provide you invaluable insight into your culture, team dynamics, process workflows, and input on how you can improve your contractor/company work arrangements. Contractors bring third-party eyes to your internal processes. Don’t be afraid to tap into their perspective.
    4. Honestly discuss performance. Contractors want to make you happy. They want to leverage their expertise to ensure you get what you need. Unless you provide performance feedback, it’s hard for them to know if they’re hitting the mark. Rather than holding a typical boss-to-employee type performance review, open up a dialogue about performance in general.  The best contractors are service-minded and will ask you for feedback so that they can make things easier or more effective for you. Return the favor and ask them as well. Discuss how things are going, what feedback you’re hearing from stakeholders, and any adjustments that need to be made to stay on track.
    5. Pave the way for future success. It’s not your job to help a contractor line up more work, but if you are pleased with their performance, by all means refer them to other groups within the company. You can be sure they won’t forget your kindness. If for any reason a contract is expected to end before the agreed-upon time, give them a heads up. If there is potential for converting to a perm hire, discuss it with them and offer them the option. You want to keep a positive relationship going so that you have the opportunity to work with them again in the future and to garner referrals from them. One thing companies often overlook is the business development aspect contractors naturally bring. Contractors that have great experiences with client companies become evangelists and often refer other clients to each other. They want you to succeed and are more than happy to help bring you business.

    These tips will help you go a long way to creating a positive experience for contractors so you can keep them engaged, retained, and returning to work for you again. By taking a look at what contractors value, you can address their needs and ensure that the project is completed in a mutually satisfying manner.

    To learn more about how Jobspring Partners can help with your IT staffing needs, please feel free to contact an IT staffing consultant at any of our locations through out North America.

  • Increasing Your Brand Image in a Changing Marketplace

    Article by CJ Terral, Recruiter in Workbridge San Jose.

    What value do you provide to the marketplace? Think about it. It’s not a question most people answer for themselves, because it’s not easy to answer and certainly more difficult to properly manage.

    The value you add is a direct correlation to your “brand”, the nebulous concept that marketers around Silicon Valley seem to chatter about on a daily basis. It’s important to realize, though, that increasing your personal brand is much more than a task on a to-do-list. It should be a lifestyle choice.

    Why do I say this? It’s simple: increasing your personal brand enhances the way others think about you, your work, and your contribution to society. It’s more valuable than money, because it’s the reason why people choose to promote you, invest in you, or even want to work with you in the first place. Increasing your brand makes you a more valuable individual to those who you directly and indirectly associate yourself with.

    Increasing your brand image is simple, but not easy. The result you’ll receive out of doing it depends on the amount of time and effort you choose to invest in improving it. As I see it, these are the 3 pillars of branding that you may want to consider when working on increasing your value in the marketplace.

    1. Consistency

    First, establish a set of guiding principles which fit around your particular lifestyle. Lacking consistency may portray you as a flaky, non-committal person who can’t be relied upon. Working on being a dependable person will help you in most any place throughout your life. It starts with understanding where you want to go, while focusing on the present and staying mindful of how to accomplish your goal at a steady, daily pace.

    2. Execution

    Learning how to implement the goals and tasks you set-up for yourself will demonstrate to others that you stay true to your word. It is much more likely for people to request your assistance on critical projects and areas of improvement with your company. Learning how to execute your goals on any level takes discipline, yet will be the reason behind your largest personal and professional achievements.

    3. Leadership

    Achieving an image in other peoples’ minds is one thing. Teaching these same lessons to others is another. Leading people who need help in increasing their personal image in the marketplace helps you as much as it does for them. You can become a resource for many groups outside of your own business industry, and that is powerful.

    All in all, increasing your brand image can be easy when done correctly. Make sure to be consistent in your beliefs and actions. Secondly, make sure to put into practice what you say you will do. Lastly, keep focused on adding value to others by leading them in the ways that allow them to also add value in their respective marketplaces. Other than that, you should aim to add value to those around you.

  • Interviewing a Passive Job Seeker

    Article by Joseph Walsh, Practice Manager in Workbridge New York

    Often, when hiring managers have an open position, they assume the majority of the resumes they receive from their networks, job boards, or recruiters belong to job seekers that are actively looking for just any job. In the technology market, this could not be farther from the truth. Many high-level IT professionals these days have the luxury of not simply accepting the first offer they receive, but instead, looking for the job that best suits them.

    The interview itself plays a huge factor in determining whether the job seeker will accept an offer from a company or not. Traditionally, interviews in the most simplistic form consist of the company bringing in job seekers to their office, asking them questions, having them meet other employees and then explaining to them what the company does and what it stands for. The person chosen for the job is most likely the best at selling themselves to their new employer during the interview process.

    This traditional interview scenario does not play itself out as often as many would think, especially in the IT industry. We are seeing more and more often, it's job seekers who are the ones interviewing the company! With the technology market as competitive as it is today for companies, the top talent often has choices when it comes to deciding on opportunities. In order to separate your company and get the best possible talent, you need to put on your sales pants!

    This means that every perk or benefit you can think of should be brought to the job seeker’s attention during the interview process. Sometimes it’s a very small detail that can make all the difference, and the reasons that people take jobs often surprise me.

    Many startups boast perks that can range anywhere from free lunches, to pet friendly offices, to pool tables, or having a sleeping room where employees can catch some Zzz’s. These perks are important to many people not because of the actual perk itself, but rather because it shows that the company CARES about its employees. That can be one of the bestselling points of all: how much do you care?

    Now, as great as these perks can be, they aren’t going to do for just anybody. Job seekers don’t take a job to do something they have been doing previously, but instead, to do something new. What new and exciting opportunity does your company offer?

  • Interviewing IT Contractors? Four Topics That Employers Mess Up

    Article by: James Vallone - Director of Business Development

    Have you ever interviewed a contractor and realized that something you just said caused them to be noticeably less interested in the job? Interviewing IT contractors is very different than interviewing perm candidates. There are a lot more land mines to look out for. Contractors think and act differently during their job search. To successfully engage IT contractors, you must be fully aware of what’s on their mind at all times and tailor your conversation to their agenda.

    Begin by understanding that a tech contractor’s job security is based on weeks or months, not years. Typically, contractors are not as interested in long-term career development at your company (unless it’s a contract-to-hire position). They will want to focus more on the specific challenges and expectations of the project at hand. Contractors also greatly value their independence and will view the employer on a peer-to-peer basis (or service provider to client basis) rather than an employee/boss relationship. They are chameleons, fitting into different cultures and becoming members of teams for temporary periods. Many are contracting with more than one company at a time, so time is their chief currency.

    To keep contractors fully engaged during the interview process and interested in your opportunity, here are some important things to pay attention to during the interview:

    1. Don’t be vague about the contract length. Let’s say the contractor asks you how long the contract period will last. You waffle and admit that you are not exactly sure or give a wishy-washy response. What does the contractor hear? They hear that maybe you’ll consume far more time than the contractor wants to commit to this engagement or, conversely, that you may not provide a long enough engagement to make it worth it for them. 

    • Advice: Always be specific about both the estimated minimum and potential timeframes so they can feel more secure about the engagement.

    2. Don’t disclose the specific contractor pay rates you are willing to pay. First off, if you’re working with a staffing firm, redirect any questions the contractor has about pay rates back to the agency. It’s the agency’s responsibility to address this. If no agency is involved, it is still not in your best interest to specify rates early on the process. Why? Because if you throw out the rate first, you may risk being too low and turn them off. He or she may decline your contract on the spot without taking the time to explore if there is room for negotiation. On the other hand, if your rate is higher than what the contractor expects, then they’ll hold you to this rate and you may end up paying more than you needed to. 

    • Advice: Ask the contractor to provide their pay expectations first so you can establish more control during negotiations.

    3. Don’t discuss your overall budget in too much detail. Any talented IT contractor will want to work for a company that has a solid and reasonable budget in place for staffing. However, they do not need to know exactly what your entire budget is. Communicating that you have a significant budget in place will certainly prove to the contractor that IT is an important initiative for the company. But the contractor may leverage this information against you and inquire as to why you’re not paying them more. And, of course, disclosing a budget number that is very low will have the obvious impact of stirring up concern about the commitment to IT spend. 

    • Advice: Use adjectives, not numbers, to discuss the financial context such as, “We have a solid or healthy or strong budget in place for this department.”

    4. Don’t make promises about contract-to-perm conversions. Some contractors may inquire about a potential conversion to permanent hire. They may ask because they are interested in converting to perm, or they are really looking for a permanent position, or because they are not interested in a permanent position altogether. It is really important to understand where this question is coming from before you provide an answer.

    • Advice: Ask the contractor first about their interest in becoming a permanent employee. If you find they are ideally looking to be converted to perm, give them a realistic timeline of when the job could convert, but be honest and explain that any conversion would be based on the contractor’s performance during the contract period and that this is not guaranteed.

    Remember, it’s your job to sell the contractor on the great opportunity they have to work at your company. You will always be competing with other employers and must differentiate your opportunity. Avoid these common interviewing obstacles and keep the interview hyper-focused on the selling points to attract the best IT contractors.

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