Workbridge Associates: Where People Meet Performance

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  • 7 Underestimated Perks To Be Thankful For At Your Job

    Game rooms. Unlimited vacation time. Free yoga classes. One year of maternity OR paternity leave. Tech companies these days are offering some phenomenal employee benefits, but not every company can afford to offer such lavish options. Sometimes it’s the simple things at a job we love that we need to appreciate. It’s easy to get swept away in the daily grind of a work day, so here is a list of little perks around the office that are worth being thankful for.


    Location, Location, Location. Chances are you probably don’t live right next door to your work, so instead of sitting in traffic right at closing time or riding the rush hour train, why not go for a walk and see what’s around? You’d be surprised how many people work in an area they never take the time to explore. Maybe you’ll find a new happy hour or a restaurant you would have never found otherwise.

    Social Coworkers

    Speaking of happy hour, they say that an office that drinks together, succeeds together. They don’t actually say that, but a Gallup study shows that employees with a best friend at work are 21% more likely to report that at work, they have the opportunity to do what they do best every day. So if you have coworkers who enjoy being social after a long, hard week, it could make you much happier and productive in the long run.

    Snacks on Snacks on Snacks

    Nothing gets you through the end of the day 2:45 like a good afternoon snack. According to USA Today, a study by PeaPod shows that while “56%,of full-time employees are "extremely" or "very" happy with their current job, that number jumps to 67% among those who have access to free food.” If your office provides healthy snacks like green tea, fruit, or vegetables it can make you feel better as well. 


    Nothing like a nice secure place to put your car every day. No need to worry about meters, street cleaning, or struggling with a tight parallel parking job! Sometimes, depending on the area, you can even park your car there on the weekend and see a show or eat at your favorite restaurants.

    Mail Access

    Who has time to wander the streets looking for a blue box? Even with apps and maps, it can be so confusing! Not to mention, who can keep track of all those pick-up times. The fact that you can get mail delivered to work is great, even better when they pick up in your building…It’s especially nice this season, because you’ll need someone to sign for all of those packages you’ll be getting after Cyber Monday!


    Depending on the size of the office, you’re probably going to eat cake every couple of months. Cookies may get delivered every few weeks. Maybe you’ll get to prank someone by taping balloons all over their workspace, or wrapping everything in gift wrap. It’s all fun and games…until it’s your birthday.

    That View

    Even if your personal workspace doesn’t have a window, there’s probably one a couple floors up. It’s always a good for the mind and body to watch the sunset. Sometimes you just have to stop and enjoy the little things in life.

    At Workbridge Associates, we sincerely hope that you have many things to be thankful for this Thursday and wish you a happy Thanksgiving. If your job isn't one of the things you're appreciative of this season, let us help you find one to put on your list to be thankful for next year.

  • Workbridge Associates Opens Up Technical Recruiting Operations in Dallas-Fort Worth

    Thriving Texas tech industry and considerable local talent creates unique need for a recruitment agency in Dallas specializing in hard-to-fill IT positions

    DALLAS (November 11, 2015) – Workbridge Associates, a leading IT recruitment agency specializing in hard-to-fill technology positions, today announced the opening of its new office in downtown Dallas. The Dallas-Fort Worth metro area has experienced major growth and gained national attention as a booming technology hub, becoming a dynamic location for the agency to provide local clients with highly-qualified candidates for a range of tech positions.

    "With the opening of this office, we’re expanding into the heart of a thriving IT community with huge growth potential,” said Matt Milano, President of Workbridge Associates. “We are perfectly positioned to work with top talent who can drive our local clients’ development in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.”

    Looking for a job or have an open role to fill? Contact the Dallas team here.

    In addition to helping local technology candidates streamline their job search, Workbridge Associates specializes in finding the best talent for hard-to-fill contract and full-time positions, including RUBY, PHP, PYTHON, UI/UXJavaScriptMobile, Java and .NET/Microsoft developers.

    This new Dallas office will be led by Division Manager Tom Parzych, and will hold up to 30 people, including recruiters, sourcers and marketing & events specialists. Workbridge Associates plans to start hiring immediately for all roles when the office opens on November 11th. Candidates can apply online at

    Workbridge’s recruitment teams pride themselves on staying fully up-to-date and conversant in the latest IT trends and developments. With extensive access to local hiring managers and technical talent, Workbridge takes a relationship-first approach that emphasizes personal engagement and added search value as much as the nuts-and-bolts objective of filling or landing a job.

    For a sneak peek at the Dallas office, see below:

    Meet the leadership team and apply to jobs in the Dallas office here.

  • Free Online Resources for Veterans During The Job Search

    Veterans have more to offer than ever, but finding a job is never easy. Are you a veteran looking for a job, or do you know someone who is? Here are some free online resources that can help veterans make connections and find jobs.

    • Military Job Networks (MJN) is an exclusive online networking platform created and enabled only for verified U.S. Military Veterans. With 3,600 online private military occupation groups, verified Veterans access private, virtual spaces for true peer-to-peer networking and knowledge sharing.
    • Hire Heroes USA has built a national reputation of excellence for helping veterans find jobs, currently at the rate of more than 60 veterans confirmed hired every week. They partner with more than 200 veteran-friendly companies to offer relevant and up-to-date job postings on the Hire Heroes USA Job Board.
    • VetJobs services are available to assist ALL members of “The United States Military Family” advance their careers and find employment. This includes Officer and Enlisted, Active Duty, Transitioning Military, Reservists, Veterans, Retirees, of the Air Force, Army, Coast Guard, Marine Corps, Merchant Marine, National Guard, Navy, NOAA and Public Health Service along with Trailing Spouses, Eligible Former Spouses, Widows, Widowers and Dependents and DOD civilians.
    • is a free web-based job board enabling federal job seekers access to thousands of job opportunities across hundreds of federal agencies and organizations.
    • has been developed and is maintained by a team of both military veterans and corporate hiring authorities. They worked hard to create a network where former military personnel can seek careers and utilize their professional skills.
    • joined forces with Monster Worldwide (NYSE: MWW) to accelerate our growth and change the playing field for career and educational opportunities for servicemembers, veterans and military spouses. Monster's vision is bringing people together to advance their lives, which is a great fit with's "members first" ethos and goal of connecting the military community to all the benefits of service.
    • is a U.S. technology industry career portal created to connect veterans, including transitioning military personnel and their family members, with meaningful jobs in America's technology industry.
    • Another free resource is enlisting the help of a recruiter. While not all specialize in placing veterans, many recruitment firms help guide professionals in their careers and place them at jobs, all at no cost to the candidate.

    Work with Workbridge Associates if you're interested in a role in IT, or check out the job board.

    For a list of further free resources for Veterans in their job search, please see the White House’s page on “Joining Forces” here

  • 6 Reasons Using GitHub Will Make You A More Desirable Candidate

    GitHub is one of the most important tools available to programmers, managers, and other professionals in the tech space. According to GitHub’s website, there are 11.6M people collaborating right now across 29.1M repositories on GitHub. The question is, how can you use this in your job search?

    Start your job search by applying to one of Workbridge's open roles on the job board.

    Prospective developers, proven ninjas, and coding wizards, if you’re contending for a new position without a GitHub account, you’re actually already one step behind. Here are 6 reasons you absolutely need to be using GitHub to make yourself a more desirable candidate:

    1. Having side projects will help you with your job search. Not only will it give you something deeper to talk about in conjuction with your current role, but also gives you the chance to develop a passion and show off your entrepreneurial side. There a number of reasons a side project could put you a notch above another candidate in a close race.
    2. It’s becoming expected. The hiring manager will be researching your GitHub account, and may even request your information alongside a resume. Take a few days to polish your account and add some non-proprietary examples of code that you have worked on. These days, companies might be a little worried if you don’t have a GitHub account.
    3. Some companies leverage GitHub in their own processes. Hiring managers are creating tech tests and small projects for candidates to complete as a way to vet talent. In the workplace, teams of programmers are able to store their work and access any changes that other team members make in real-time. Being well-versed in the system is a skill in and of itself.
    4. GitHub is a community where you can meet other developers. You can network, connect, comment on, discuss, share your work, collaborate on projects or build upon others’ efforts. In a word, use GitHub to “engage.” You never know, that partner on a project could be your next employer.
    5. It can demonstrate your skills. Many companies won't interview someone without code samples, and often job seekers cannot share their code because it's proprietary. With GitHub you can post projects outside of work. With that said, don't be afraid to post unfinished projects! Many times, technologists are hesitant to do this, but it can actually reveal a lot about who you are as a developer and show your thought process.   
    6. You’re expanding upon your tech knowledge. Learning new languages that you’re not currently using at work, or honing skills that you'd like to keep growing, is important - especially if you’re working for a company with an old code base or spending most of your time doing maintenance instead of new coding. Managers love to see people who are passionate about technology and spend time outside of work researching the newest frameworks and languages.

    Submit your resume and a Workbridge associate will contact you about your job search.

    Whether you view it as a social network, a warehouse or a host, use GitHub to its full potential. Perhaps you are searching for that next gig or just trying to stay relevant with one of the hundreds of JavaScript frameworks, but either way, GitHub will continue to facilitate the advancement of software development around the Globe. As the tech industry continues to exponentially change the face of everyday life, it is up to you as a professional in this space to be conscious of trends in order to stay competitive – when you’re on the job hunt, you’ll thank yourself.


  • The 5-minute Guide to Nailing The Interview

    Beginning a job search and interviewing for a new position can be an intimidating task. Which items should I put on or leave off my resume? Which topics should I prepare for?  How do I deal with questions that I don’t have answers to? With a few pointers, you can get organized and put yourself in the best possible position for your interview. Here's a quick guide on how to nail an interview. 

    Don't have an interview set up yet? Get the job search process started with these openings.

    Pre-Interview Preparation

    1. Let’s start with the very first thing: your resume.  This is the first impression that you make on your next potential employer; it needs to be a good one! There are a lot of misconceptions about what to list, and what not to list on your resume. Take a long hard look at what you're including and how you're including it. Here are some "dos and don'ts":

    • Do make sure that you are concise and to the point with everything you include.  
    • Don’t make the mistake of making things sound a lot more complicated than they were.  
    • Do start with a simple and clear objective.  The objective should (obviously) line-up with the position that you are applying to.  
    • Do make sure your resume reflects the role that you are applying for. For instance, if you are applying to an individual contributor opening, it doesn’t make sense to list that you are seeking a managerial position.
    • Don’t go overboard and list every technology and skill known to man in an effort to attract interest.  If a technology or skill is listed on your resume, it's fair game to be asked about in the interview. Stick to what you are comfortable and confident using. 
    • Do include skill level. If you have basic experience in some technologies and skills, indicate that.
    • Do focus on your experience. One of the biggest pet peeves for hiring managers is when they ask about a skill, and the candidate’s response being somewhat along the lines of, “I haven’t done much work with that.” Hiring managers are more interested in the work that you’ve done than seeing a long list of skills.  Spend most of your time showing employers how you’ve used your skills rather than listing technologies or skill sets.  
    • Don't write an encyclopedia, last but not least.  Try and keep your resume to 2 pages max.

    2. Have an up-to-date LinkedIn profile, and research your interviewer. This is basic, and most people have done this already, but it's important to have an updated profile as LinkedIn is probably the most used tool by both employers and job-seekers. You'll open yourself up to a number of different opportunities, and give employers the chance to come and find you. This is also a great way to learn about people you will be meeting with in upcoming interviews.  Take the time to research the people that you’ll be meeting to see if you share any common connections, and to learn more about their background.  These will all be great topics of discussion when it’s your turn to talk and ask questions during the interview.  Interviewers will be happy to see that you’ve taken the time to do research on them, an indicator to them that you’re taking the interview seriously.

    3. Do your homework on the company that you are meeting with.  Make sure you have as good of an understanding as possible of what the company does, and what some of their products are.  When it’s your turn to ask questions in the interview, don’t be the person that asks, “So, what exactly does your company do?”  As obvious as this sounds you’ll be surprised at how often people make this mistake.  This is one of the biggest turn offs to potential employers, and gives the impression that you don’t have any real interest in the position.

    4. Have examples ready to go. Make sure you have at least 1 or 2 projects that you’ve worked on recently that you’re most proud of and ready to talk about.  Every interview has a portion where candidates are expected to discuss and explain in details the projects that they’ve worked on in the past. Employers are often going to be interested in the most recent projects that you’ve worked on, so make sure you can explain those fully. On top of that, if there are projects that you’ve worked on in the past that are directly related to the role then make sure to bring these up. Don’t gloss over the projects either - go into specific details.  Employers are interested in hearing why you chose to design and develop things in a certain manner.

    During the Interview

    Ok, now you’ve made it to the interview. How do you conduct yourself? What should you always remember?

    1. Answer questions directly.  Be sure to pay attention to the question that is being asked, and focus on answering that question alone.  Do not go off onto a different subject, and start talking about a completely different topic.  There will be opportunities for you later in the interview to bring up topics that you’d like to discuss.

    2. Be honest about your skill set. Similar to listing skills on your resume, if you’re asked a question that you don’t know the answer to, don’t pretend to know the answer!  Chances are the person asking you the question knows the right answer, so pretending to know the answer and giving a wrong answer will be a detriment to your candidacy.  Let the interviewer know that you don’t know the answer to that question….but don’t stop there!  Try and come up with a solution to the problem based on what you know about the topic.  Employers are often very interested in seeing what type of problem solving skills potential employees have, and to see their thought process. 

    3. Remember, it’s okay not to know everything. On that note, it’s not okay to have no initiative to take on new challenges.  Rarely are employers going to find a candidate that has 100% of the skills that they’re looking for. Part of the reason you’re probably looking for a new job is to learn new skills, and most employers know this. Show them that you’re able to pick up new skills quickly by proposing a solution to the problem, even if you don't have those hard skills yet.

    4. Don’t let a rude interviewer rattle you. There will be times when you run into interviewers who come off as impolite. There could be a couple of reasons for this, or maybe the person genuinely is a rude person. Don’t let that put you off for the rest of the interview. After meeting with him/her, you may decide that this company is not the right place for you, and that’s okay. Just keep calm through the interview and make a positive impression. You never know when you might cross paths with them again. Another reason the person might have this demeanor is because they’re using an interview tactic; working in engineering and IT is known to have situations that end up being high pressure and stressful.  Some employers want to see how certain people will react when they’re put in uncomfortable and high-stress situations.  Continue to do what you’ve been doing in the interview, and don’t let this bother you.

    5. Engage your interviewers….at the appropriate times. Always remember that the interview is a platform for the employer to assess your skills, and see if you are a fit for their company.  Yes, it is also a time for you to figure out whether or not the company is a fit for you, but there will be an opportunity for you to do that. When you are given the opportunity make sure that you have questions prepared, and topics to discuss with them.  You need to show the employer that you are genuinely interested in the position. Start with questions specifically about the company, and the job itself. Leave compensation/benefits questions for later. You don’t want to give off an impression that those things are the only important topics for you.  Employers are going to want to hire people who are interested in the company because of the project and how you will be contributing.

    Get more tips on how to interview from a Workbridge office near you.

    Post Interview

    Always remember to follow-up with a thank you note after your interview.  This may seem like a trivial gesture, but it could be the differentiator between you and other candidates.  There are many times where an employer is struggling to decide between 2-3 candidates, and end up hiring the candidate that wrote the thank-you note because it was that one extra something. This will show your appreciation for being considered for the position, and gives you another opportunity to show your interest in the job.

    • The letter doesn’t need to be too long, but also shouldn’t be a generic short letter. You want to show that you actually put some time and thought into writing the letter. 
    • That means it should not look like you googled an outline and filled in blanks.
    • In the letter, thank the manager for setting up the interview and having his team set aside time to meet with you.  
    • Bring up specific parts of the interview that you enjoyed, and specific reasons as to why you’re interested in the job.  
    • Close the letter out with something along the lines of you look forward to hearing from them regarding their decision, and if there are any questions they have they should contact you.


    That’s a quick guide to interviewing. Good luck job-seekers! 

    Written by: Aadil Alavi, Lead Recruiter of Workbridge Silicon Valley 

  • 4 Reasons to Work With Multiple Technologies

    In the land of software development, there's more than one correct way to solve a problem. Since technology itself is limitless, it should come as no surprise that the available tools and resources are boundless as well. Now the question is, which tools should we choose, not only to get the job done, but also to best express oneself?

    Those who work with technical people every day have probably noticed that very few companies use only a single technology for their IT needs. Just like those companies, often the best technical people don't limit themselves to one brand of tools or frameworks. They step outside their technical comfort zones and experiment with anything they can get their hands on. 

    Here are four reasons why you might benefit personally and professionally from trying out new technologies. 

    1) Learn New Paradigms

    Most programmers are familiar with procedural or object-oriented programming. Functional programming, on the other hand, can provide a more concise representation of data transformations. Rather than "how", you describe "what", and the tools can help you transform the data as needed. Scala is a language that combines object-oriented and functional paradigms (for those on the JVM). Underscore.JS is a library allowing you to use the familiar filter, map, fold primitives, and a lot more, in JavaScript. 

    2) Learn New Ways to Use Old Technologies

    Speaking of functional programming, your experience may cause you to look at LINQ on the .NET platform in a new light. One technology hiring manager was explaining that his organization’s use of Angular.JS (with its draconian dependency injection) caused his team to think differently about DI containers in their .NET server side, resulting in more flexible and more testable C#. In this way, working with one technology influenced how they interacted with another.

    3) Job Mobility

    Here are four basic ways that broadening your technical repertoire can open up possibilities for career advancement.

    • You can contribute to different areas of the same project (front-end to back-end, application to data analysis, etc.)
    • You can move to new projects entirely (has your organization been piloting a new tech stack?)
    • You can move to new organizations entirely. If this is the case, I can refer you to a specialist. (Wink!)

    And finally,

    • Some organizations only fill full-stack or generalist positions. It’s worth mentioning that this is often true of smaller product development companies or startups.

    4) Right Tool for the Job

    Many organizations are pushing the limits of relational databases. The high performance or high availability required by their applications call for something new. NoSQL databases are answering this call, but often each in their own way. Spend some time understanding their relative merits and you can be your organization’s hero. Can you drop joins and go for the high performance of key store or document databases? Is your problem better suited by a graph database? What these specialized databases give up in the relational model they make up for by excelling in their particular area of application.

    multiple devices

    The following books are a great resource if you’re looking to expand your knowledge of current and new technologies:

    • “Seven Languages in Seven Weeks: A Pragmatic Guide to Learning Programming Languages” by Bruce Tate
    • “Seven Databases in Seven Weeks: A Guide to Modern Databases and the NoSQL Movement” by Eric Redmond

    There are many benefits to be had from interacting with a range of technologies. Whether you’re looking for new ways to tackle an assignment or hoping to advance your career by opening new doors, there is no reason to limit yourself to one brand of tools or frameworks. 

  • Looking to Advance Your Career? Tips for Recent Computer Science and Dev Bootcamp Grads

    Article written by Jaime Vizzuett, Practice Manager at Workbridge Orange County

    So you did it, you’ve completed your college degree or spent a tireless amount of weeks learning to code in a hardcore bootcamp – congratulations! But now what? While everyone’s career path will be unique and there’s no step-by-step guide to getting you to a C-Level position within x-amount of years, there are definitely career moves you can make to set yourself up for the success you’re looking for.

    As a Practice Manager at a highly-recommended tech recruiting agency in Orange County, CA, I’ve come across plenty of Junior-level engineers seeking to get into a Mid-level role to advance their career. For those not qualified for the position, my dedicated team and I were able to give those candidates feedback on how they can better brand themselves, and what skill set was needed to turn them into a highly sought after candidate. We focus on the Orange County and San Diego tech markets and have close relationships with hiring managers at companies as small as startups all the way up to Fortune 500’s. Because of this, we know what hiring managers are looking for in Junior to Mid-level engineers. Below are the five smartest moves to make after graduating from a dev bootcamp or college with your C.S. degree:

    Build Your Brand

    Update your Linkedin profile to include a personal summary, a work or project summary and include your skills in the appropriate sections. Nowadays this is one of the major ways recruiters from companies and agencies get connected with you about a job you may be the right fit for.

    Get on Github. For many hiring managers this is a 'nice-to-have' but for junior engineers this is especially crucial as it may be the only thing a manager has to look at. 

    Connect with a Dedicated Recruiter

    Find a dedicated technical recruiter who specializes in positions where you’re looking to work or understands your skill set. Even if they can’t offer you a position right off the bat, inquire about interview advice, resume tips or keep in touch with them for later on in your career.

    Network and Get Noticed

    If you haven’t yet tried out the networking aspect of looking for a job, step out of your comfort zone and add it to your to-do list. Meetups and networking events such as the one that my company organizes for tech professionals, Tech in Motion, are a great way to get your name out in front of an influential group of people.

    When you are vocal about your employment status, you might find your next mentor or even your next job at an event or job fair, so make sure to put your best foot forward.

    Stay Current

    You will hear it over and over again, but keeping up with the newest technology is crucial in any market. Every company wants someone who has experience with the trendy new technology that very few other engineers have, so being ahead of the curve will set you apart.

    Keep Motivated

    Just because you have been on the market for a few weeks, doesn’t mean you should lose motivation. Great things take time! Every company has different needs. You just need to find one that fits your criteria and vice versa, and sometimes that takes time.

    Bottom line is that building your reputation in a way that advances your career will take time. Following these steps will point you in the right direction and hopefully help you find a job that you truly will be passionate about. By staying up-to-date with technology, networking and building your own brand, you will find the search more successful.

  • Workbridge Associates Expands IT Recruiting Operations in Canada

    Largest concentration of tech talent in Canada makes it the ideal location for recruitment agency specializing in hard-to-fill IT positions

    Boston, August 10, 2015 -- Workbridge Associates, a leading IT recruitment agency specializing in hard-to-fill technology positions, has announced the opening of their new office located in the heart of downtown Toronto. The city's emergence as the largest and most dynamic hub of technology talent in Canada makes it the perfect location, and allows the agency to provide Toronto area clients with highly qualified candidates for a wide range of IT positions.

    "We're excited to expand our footprint further by opening this office in the center of Canada's largest city," said Matt Milano, President of Workbridge Associates. "This new office in Toronto puts us in a better position to help our clients find that perm and contract IT talent they need to build their businesses."

    Workbridge Associates specializes in staffing hard to fill IT positions including RUBYPHPPYTHONUI/UXJavaScriptMobile, and .NET/Microsoft developers. This new Toronto office will be managed and led by Matt McKinney, Division Manager. The new office will hold up to 30 people, including Recruiters, Sourcers, and Marketing & Events Specialists.

    See the official Press Release distributed by CNW.

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