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Archive: October - 2014 (3)

  • How to Hire a .NET Engineer

    Article by Kathleen Nealon, Practice Manager in Workbridge New York

    The competition for engineering talent around the country has become very stiff and one of the most competitive places to find good engineers is New York City. Here in NYC, the tech hub is growing rapidly and even starting to rival Silicon Valley. “Silicon Alley” is becoming a force to be reckoned with. Between 2009 and 2013, venture capital invested in the New York metro area was up 76% and the fourth quarter of 2013 was the first since 2001 to attract more than $1 billion.

    With all of this money going into startups, companies are looking to hire the best engineers on the market. Often the first couple of tech hires are crucial for the company’s growth and success down the line. When it comes time to hire the first couple of engineers and developers, whether you are looking for a PHP Developer or .Net Developer, it has become no secret that both are very hard to find. Why is that?

    As a Technical Recruiter who has been working the New York market for the past five years, I have seen a lot of changes from the 2009-2010 market compared to 2014 and have come up with four theories about why it is so hard to hire a .NET Engineer.

    The term “.NET Engineer” is used too broadly

    .Net is a framework created by Microsoft that developers can use to create applications more easily. A framework is essentially a bunch of code that the programmer can call without having to write it explicitly. Therefore .NET Engineers (and .NET Developers) are best defined as a type of web programmer with a strong understanding of the .NET framework.

    Saying you need a .NET Engineer/Developer is an extremely general statement and without giving any more information, you most likely won’t get exactly what you’re looking for.

    So, in other words, it isn’t .NET Engineers in general that are hard to find; it is the specific skill sets and areas of expertise that are a challenge to find.

    There are many .Net Engineers out there, but their skill set doesn’t always match what companies think they need 

    Speaking in terms of numbers, there may not be a lack of .NET Engineers but rather a lack of understanding about what skills would make a good fit.

    Most employers are currently looking for five plus years of .NET development experience even though the .NET framework has only become widespread within the last few years. A possible solution to this dilemma is for employers to start considering more entry level developers who have the passion, desire and potential to learn and grow into the role.

    Also, if hiring managers set their expectations or requirements too tightly, they can lose sight of solid developers. For example, say a company was ideally looking for someone with Java experience but come across an amazing C++ developer. It’s important to determine which skill sets and languages are “must have” versus “nice to have” at the beginning of the hiring process so as not to miss out on great developers with a lot of potential and flexible skill sets.

    Companies want an experienced and highly skilled employee, but aren’t willing to train to get that person

    A lot of highly qualified candidates are already employed and may, at most, be passively looking for new positions. The unemployment rate for technology professionals fell to 3.5 percent in the fourth quarter of 2013 compared to the total U.S. Unemployment Rate of 6.3 percent.

    .NET changes very frequently, so it can often be hard for developers and engineers to keep up with every update. Realistically, it’s almost impossible for someone to know all of .NET, therefore, either engineers need to be constantly learning in order to stay up to date on what’s current or companies need to help them.

    A big part of my job is helping hiring managers set realistic expectations around skills and what they need in a candidate versus what they would really like to have. I also like to advise my candidates on what hiring managers are looking for and what training could make them even more competitive within the industry.

    Often, managers are looking for people who are experts in many aspects of technology. They spend months searching for these individuals and not find anyone because it is so hard to find candidates in this market who can hit every category on the hiring manager’s wish list. I always suggest that my clients hire people who are eager to learn and passionate about the role— the company can always train for the unmet points on the wish list.

    Companies hiring processes may take too long for “hot” candidates

    Lastly (and specifically on the .NET side) a lot of large corporations in New York City use .NET but, because of their size, the hiring process can be a timely ordeal with many different steps. This often results in hot candidates taking jobs at smaller to mid-size companies because they can move quicker.

    Overall, there may be a large number of .NET Engineers in New York City but finding the perfect candidate for you company can be very challenging. By determining exactly what skills you need in an employee, searching for someone who is willing to learn and train on new technologies, and is passionate about the opportunity you have to offer will help you speed up your hiring process in order to find the hottest available candidates for your company.

  • Wearables: The Newest Form of Mobile Technology

    Article by Ed Vitela, Practice Manager in Workbridge Los Angelos

    Wearable technology is the latest and most exciting form of mobile technology and is one which promises to bring even further changes to our daily lives. At this point in time, about everyone owns, or knows someone who owns, a smartphone. The 'smart' technology that we have become accustomed to associating with our phones is quickly branching out of 'phone only' territory and into other wearable devices.

    Apple Watch, Google Glass, Fitbit, Jawbone UP and other fitness trackers are just a few examples of the smart accessories, smart apparel, and smart "things" providing us with a glimpse into the ever expanding window of our technological future. Smartphones, such as iOS and Android devices, have produced capabilities and conveniences, in both our personal and professional lives, which were unimaginable a decade ago. Many would find it unnecessarily difficult to go a single day without utilizing at least one form of mobile technology or another, and it this mentality which has paved the way for wearables to be highly anticipated and sought after.

    As with any new technology, there are benefits as well as possible drawbacks given the wide array of wearables currently available. Ongoing arguments for and against wearables, both in their current state, as well the larger implications that may come with them in the future, may cause some to dismiss wearables altogether. However, this is a forward movement that cannot be ignored. Discussion is the impetus of change, and the first step to imagination becoming reality.

    Wearable technology will not stay limited to its current state, but will progress and evolve just as its technological predecessors. While leisure and luxury products receive the most attention, the technology also provides huge opportunities to businesses and quality of life with its unique ability to capture data that had previously been unable to be gathered, analyzed and used in a meaningful way. Wearables should not only be utilized, but fully embraced. They are powerful tools to facilitate and ease our work and our personal lives, and may even one day help us overcome our own limitations.

  • The Growing Demand for Data Scientists

    Article by Scott Brosnan, Practice Manager in Workbridge San Francisco 

    Companies are using data to better understand consumers and the immense amount of new data pouring into their system. They know that this just might be the most important driver of business for success in today’s world. Whether it is a small startup or a multi-billion company like Netflix or Facebook, data is at the core in making better business decisions. Companies now save every detail about every click of the mouse. Online companies are able to track the browsing patterns and habits of their users. This allows them to use that data to attract new users with similar profiles and characteristics of existing users. 

    There is a growing demand for individuals who can analyze this data and derive insights from it. This trend will continue to grow as more companies are trying to find ways to capitalize on this information. Companies are willing to (or having to) pay top dollar for individuals that possess these abilities.

    A recent McKinsey report revealed some staggering statistics in the data science field.  There are roughly 140,000 people that are working as data scientists right now, and by the year 2018 there will be a shortage of 150,000 to 190,000 people with data science abilities. The field is just so new that it is a simple supply and demand issue. Every company is trying to make more sense of their data and find ways to most effectively use it. There are just not enough people with the skill set to keep up with the demand. 

    Most data scientists right now have studied mathematics, statistics or computer sciences.  Unbelievably, up until 2 years ago there was no data science or data analytics programs or major option in any university or school. One of the best indicators for the increasing need for data scientist, are the number of programs that are popping up around the country. We have seen programs begin at University of California, Berkeley, University of San Francisco and Indiana University.

     

    As more and more companies look to take advantage of their data, the demand for data scientists will continue to grow.

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